Genesis 10 – Sometimes I’m Wrong

I want to start this one off with an observation. Genesis 10 is Noah’s genealogy, and it starts by going down Japheth’s branch of the family tree. Talking about all his offspring, it concludes, “From these the coastlands of the nations were separated into their lands, every one according to his language, according to their families, into their nations” (5). I read that, and I thought to myself: hey, here we’ve got differentiation of language. No, wait, re-differentiation of language! It struck me that the Tower of Babel didn’t account for the multiplicity of human languages after all: Noah and his family represented a second choke point where everyone once again shared a single native tongue. Except that I got the chronology wrong. The Tower of Babel doesn’t precede the flood; it follows it.

Genesis 5 – The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Big Round Years

At some point in my early childhood, I came into possession of a set of Wildlife Treasury cards. Each oversized card on the front the animal’s name, a photograph, and extremely dope icons indicating the animal’s class, habitat, and geographic range. The back of the card gave additional information, but I was all about those icons, sorting and re-sorting my collection in all sorts of permutations. If I were just a little older, I probably would have devised a game by which the animals could battle each other, gaining terrain advantages in different ecosystems and so forth.