Psalm 123 – Duck’s Instep

Are you familiar with the expression “lower than a duck’s instep?” Given how many of you are my relatives, you probably are. But in case you need an explanation, it means “super-low”–because a duck, with its flat feet, has the lowest instep you can imagine. It’s basically the opposite of being “fine as frog’s hair.” And today’s psalm is for people in a situation that is lower than a duck’s instep.

Psalm 122 – The Peace of the City of Peace

Like yesterday’s psalm, the first verse of this psalm has inspired a contemporary English worship song. I will not, however, be linking to a recording of it, because here are the lyrics: “I was glad when they said unto me, I was glad when they said unto me, I was glad when they said unto me, ‘Let us go into the house of the Lord.’ So glad (so glad), so glad (so glad), so glad (so glad), so glad (so glad).” (repeat until dead)

Psalm 117 – Rock the Laud, Laud the Rock

What’s the shortest song you can think of? Two of my favorite bands, Five Iron Frenzy and They Might Be Giants, have no shortage of short songs. Here’s one. Here’s another. And these short songs tend to be goofy ditties with nonsensical lyrics poking fun at their own brevity, but what happens when a short song takes itself and its subject matter entirely seriously? Psalm 117 happens, that’s what.

Psalm 115 – Idol Hands Are Devolved Worship

If the central question of modern theology is “What is the nature of God?” then the central question of theology in the ancient Near East was “Which gods should we worship?” In ancient cultures, towns would commonly adopt a patron deity, and there were no shortage of choices. Just take a look at Wikipedia’s list of Mesopotamian deities. And people would commonly fashion sculptures of their deities as part of their worship: they’d make idols.

Psalm 112 – Generous Slavery

Sometimes the psalm summarizes itself for you. Consider the opening lines of today’s psalm: “How blessed is the man who fears the Lord, who greatly delights in His commandments!” (112:1). The rest of the psalm is basically a litany of blessings for the man who fears the Lord. He receives a well-established family tree, material wealth, a good legacy, victory over his adversaries, and more. But let’s zero in on a verse in the middle of the psalm, characterizing this man of many blessings. The man is merciful–and a creditor.

Psalm 101 – My Little Psalmist: Friendship is Morality

Welcome to another exciting installment of Chocolate Book: Paper Towel Airport Edition. As I write this, I’m in the Fort Lauderdale Airport, and in an hour I’ll be heading to Columbus via a layover in Atlanta. As usual, you will be reading this much, much later in the day than all that. On the menu today is Psalm 101, a Psalm of David–and the first psalm in awhile with the author explicitly stated. Like Psalm 26, one of its major themes is the psalmist’s uprightness. However, Psalm 26 asserts the psalmist’s uprightness as grounds for vindication and protection by God. In contrast, Psalm 101 is more along the lines of, “Hey, God, I’m gonna be a good man because being good matters to me.”